The Issue

Addressing the health of communities is an essential aspect of fighting poverty. Global health issues kill more people each year than conflict, and as of 2014, one billion people lacked access to health care systems. When people are spending their limited income and time on health needs, they are more likely to remain poor. But being poor is also a contributor to health problems – people often live in environments that make them sick, or have difficulty accessing adequate healthcare services.

Health spans a range of issues, from health during pregnancy and childbirth, to tackling diseases such as cancer and HIV, mental health, adequate nutrition, healthy lifestyles and more.

What we are doing

We are working with our partners to improve quality of life for those who don’t have access to adequate health care, and ensuring that people have hope in a future that won’t be cut short by preventable disease or health complications. This includes HIV screening in Mozambique, and community awareness and prevention programs in Kenya and Mozambique, breast cancer awareness and diagnosis in Gaza, and psychosocial support for traumatised children in East Jerusalem (both in the Occupied Palestinian Territories).

Where we are doing it

Get the Facts

  1. Sub-Saharan Africa is severely affected by HIV/AIDS. One in every 20 adults lives with HIV, which accounts for 71% of people living with HIV worldwide.
  2. Undernutrition contributes to half of all deaths in African children under the age of five.
  3. Maternal mortality rate is between 8%-11% of all births in Kenya and Ethiopia.
  4. In Gaza the survival rate for women with breast cancer is 40%. In Australia the survival rate is 90%.

Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4

Anglican Overseas Aid has had a relationship with the Mt Kenya West Diocese since 1995. Since 2000, we have been supporting the Anglican Church of Kenya in its efforts to improve access to health for women and children, and addressing the links between poverty and violence against women and children.

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Biotisho – health access for Maasai project

We are supporting the Biotisho project in Kenya. This project aims at improving health access for Maasai mothers and babies in Laikipia County in the north of the country, in the Diocese of Mount Kenya West.

The Biotisho project is building on the significant impact of The Road Less Travelled (TRLT) project, which was a five year grant from the Australian Government. TRLT contributed to a 400 percent increase in mothers giving birth in a health centre as opposed to giving birth at home.

The Biotisho project is a partnership between the Anglican Church in Kenya and the local Ministry of Health.

If you would like to donate to the Biotisho project, click on the ‘Please Donate’ button (choose ‘Kenya – Biotisho – health access for Maasai’ from the ‘Donation’ drop-down menu):

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Imarisha – building safer communities project

The other project we are supporting in Kenya is the Imarisha Kwa Kuzingatia Haki Na Usawa project, which means ‘Improving the quality of lives by enhancing rights and equality’. This project is implemented in Nyeri County in the Diocese of Mount Kenya West. The project seeks to build safer communities, by addressing the link between poverty and violence against women and children. The Anglican Church of Kenya aims to raise community awareness about the realities of domestic violence, and how to support survivors.

Training and education about violence and child protection is provided to a range of groups, including schools, community leaders, through health centres and for government workers.

Through this project, the Anglican Church of Kenya also aims to equip people with skills to provide for themselves and lift themselves out of poverty. It has established community gardens and is helping farmers introduce new methods to improve sustainability and productivity, particularly in a changing climate.  Farmers are also learning about how to increase their income from farming.

If you would like to donate to the Imarisha Kwa Kuzingatia Haki Na Usawa project project, click on the ‘Please Donate’ button (choose ‘Kenya – Imarisha – building safer communities’ from the ‘Donation’ drop-down menu):

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Funding: The Biotisho project is funded by donations from the Australian public. The Imarisha project is funded by grants from the Australian Government’s aid program and donations from the Australian public.

Our partner in Mozambique, the Anglican Diocese of Niassa, leads the Community-led Health and Wellbeing Project (Community Response to HIV) project, which has a core focus on responding to high levels of HIV infection.

The program’s success is built on teams of volunteers from each community – called Equipas de Vida or Teams of Life – taking responsibility for community education and action on HIV and AIDS.

This includes door-to-door health promotion to educate communities about how to prevent the spread of HIV, encourage people to be tested, talk about their HIV status and stress the importance of using antiretroviral medication. This approach also allows the teams to reach vulnerable people who don’t have access to testing facilities, including women and people with a disability.

The Equipas also take responsibility for supporting vulnerable people, including those with HIV.

If you would like to donate to our work in Mozambique, click on the ‘Please Donate’ button (choose ‘Mozambique – Health & Wellbeing’ from the ‘Donation’ drop-down menu):

Funding: This project is funded by grants from the Australian Government’s aid program and donations from the Australian public.

In Gaza, a range of factors mean that women have a high death rate from breast cancer, and a combination of ignorance and cultural beliefs means women with the disease are not supported well as they face a life-threatening disease. Our response is Women’s Health, Women’s Rights: improving breast cancer survival in Gaza, a project led by Al Ahli Arab Hospital, an Anglican institution run by the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. The hospital runs a breast screening clinic so that women can detect cancers earlier and access appropriate treatment sooner.

The project also works to raise community awareness of breast cancer and the importance of screening and early detection, and educates men about the realities of the disease and the need to support women. This community work takes place through a network of more than 30 grassroots organisations.

If you would like to donate to our work at the Ahli Arab Hospital in Gaza, click on the ‘Please Donate’ button (choose ‘Palestine – Al Ahli Hospital Gaza’ from the ‘Donation’ drop-down menu):

Funding: This project is funded by grants from the Australian Government’s aid program and donations from the Australian public.

In the old city in Jerusalem, the Spafford Children’s Center works with vulnerable and disadvantaged children who are often traumatised by conflict.

Often such children withdraw and suffer from poor linguistic development and communication skills, which affects their ongoing development and education. The centre uses a holistic approach to child health that responds to a child’s medical, psychological, social and educational needs.

Children in the special education program receive psychological testing, which enables staff to prepare individual programs of intensive treatment. These programs are often complemented by play therapy, speech therapy, social work and cultural activities. As a result, a large majority of children are re-integrated into the educational system and improve their school performance.

Funding: This project is funded by donations from the Australian public.

If you would like to donate to our work at the Spafford Chldren’s Center, click on the ‘Please Donate’ button (choose ‘Jerusalem – Spafford Children’s Center’ from the ‘Donation’ drop-down menu):